A formidable obstacle to peace on the Continent...

A formidable obstacle to peace on the Continent...

The crowning achievement of the pre-Victorian era, the Myrmidon first appeared in Europe in the mid- to late 18th Century. The Myrmidon is a construct of demon-hardened ceramics, artificially living flesh and bone, and superhard steel. Endowed with the spirit of a simple Demon and bound to specific magical and religious commands, the Myrmidon is capable of following simple orders delivered by a priest, infernalist or conjuror. The Demon measures about 7’ in height and has strength greater than any human; it is also very fast, and the Demon learns to fight just as a normal human would. Inexperienced Myrmidons fight as well as an untrained militiaman, but as the Demons become older and more experienced they improve their skills just as does a normal warrior, though more slowly due to their extremely limited intellect. Myrmidons are always accompanied by a priest or infernal engineer and are designed to fall apart when administered a command from a remote location, preventing their capture or the revelation of their deeper secrets. They heal minor damage if inside a church, though major repairs require experienced technicians. They can follow simple sets of commands, and can be given a “framework” within which to operate, with the framework following a basic template such as skirmisher, warrior or berserker.

Myrmidons are heavily armoured and highly resistant to infernal energy. Magical energy and physical attacks do no more damage than usual, though it takes a formidable mortal to penetrate their magically enhanced shell, and their huge physical structure takes considerable damage to wear down. Most Myrmidons also have at least some basic combat feats, and most are also designed to incorporate an infernal rifle or pistol of some sort. Some of the more intelligent constructs may also contain a confustor or impulsion field rod, and as their design becomes more sophisticated they also develop powers of flight, teleportation or leaping. By the mid-19th century, they became the most feared soldier on the battlefield, proof against all but the most hardened of soldiers.